HSP Studies

Studies of Highly Sensitive People

Studies are studies. Before there was the study and the research, there was the person. Of course, studies lend credibility and can make the HSP seem “less crazy” or can give us the validation and acceptance we crave. I cannot stress the importance of Maslow’s hierarchy of needs here. Suicides, institutionalization, alcoholism, drug abuse, food abuse, sugar sensitivity and various other addictions and problems a person has can ALWAYS be traced back to a difference in realities between the person and the world s/he sees around her/him.

It is so important that an HSP – or any person who feels *different* – can garner a community or peer group of likeminds. It is here that the person can find social acceptance and move onto self-actualization. This is not to say that self-acceptance and actualization cannot be had without ever finding their own social *niche* but typically it is less painful and quite helpful to the speed and growth of the newly understood HSP. [This is why I have been concurrently working on an HSP website which I hope to unveil as soon as I get this website finally moved and updated! April 18, 2010]

HSP Studies:

  1. Neurobiological Phenomenon: (Abstract) Researchers often use the term “sensitivity ” when theorizing that certain persons may be more readily affected by various influences than others. Through a review of the literature, it is argued that some individuals are disposed toward a range of sensitivities that, in novelty as well as intensity, distinguish them from the general population. The author cites evidence indicating that such persons exhibit greater susceptibility to a range of environmental factors including allergies, migraine headache, chronic pain, and chronic fatigue. Their immediate family members appear to be similarly affected. Additionally, these “sensitive” individuals report a high degree of anomalous perception. While no single factor in a person’s background is likely to distinguish him/her as sensitive, eight demographic or personality factors are found to be significant.
  2. Apparitional Experience: (Abstract) Psi researchers often use the term ‘sensitivity’ when theorizing that certain persons may be more apt to register anomalous influences than others. Through a review of the literature, it is argued that some individuals are disposed toward a range of innate sensitivities that, in novelty as well as intensity, distinguish them from the general population. It is hypothesized that such persons will exhibit greater susceptibility to a range of environmental factors including allergies, migraine headache, chronic pain and chronic fatigue. Furthermore, it is suggested that sensitive individuals will report a higher than average degree of psi perception as well as apparent electromagnetic influence. Through a 54-item survey designed by the author, the following issues are evaluated: the extent to which persons who describe themselves as ‘sensitive’ appear to be affected by such factors; whether their immediate family members may be similarly affected; to what extent environmental sensitivity parallels apparitional experience; and how such findings compare or contrast with questions asked of a control group. Based on both the literature and the survey results, the author argues that sensitivity is a bona fide neurobiological phenomenon. While no single factor in a person’s background is likely to distinguish him/her as ‘sensitive,’ eight demographic or personality factors are found to be statistically significant. If further studies were to document similar results, a more tangible basis would be provided for the study of apparitional experience than has been possible to date.

I will add more HSP Studies or Relevant Data here as I Find It